Why jobs and livelihoods matter

By Aurelio Parisotto, Senior Economist, International Labour Organization

Girls carry bricks in the town of Zemio in Uganda
Girls carry bricks in the town of Zemio in Uganda

As we approach the 2015 deadline for the current Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), we have a golden opportunity to put jobs and livelihoods at the top of the international development agenda. This is not simply according to the ILO. The first results of the UN ‘My World’ global survey, which asked people in 190 countries for their priorities for a post-2015 development agenda, show that “jobs are a high priority everywhere.”

From Albania and Jordan to Vietnam and Zambia, the call for more and better job opportunities was also made loud and clear in online discussions and national consultations organized by the UN. In Uganda, of the 17,000 people consulted, about half said that getting a job was their top priority. Many also mentioned the need for better social protection, especially in informal sectors where economic and social insecurity is high.

These demands are not surprising given the current global labour market situation.

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Priorities for the global development agenda shaped by unprecedented public outreach effort

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PRESS RELEASE

New York, 21 March 2013 – The United Nations presented today the first findings from an unprecedented global conversation through which people from all over the world have been invited to help Member States shape the future development agenda that will build on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) after their target date at the end of 2015.

The snapshot report of initial findings entitled “The Global Conversation Begins” was delivered to more than 100 representatives of Member States who will negotiate the future development agenda that is likely to build on the MDGs and sustainable development agenda from Rio+20.

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Post-2015 development agenda must address youth issues – new UN envoy

Youth Envoy Ahmad Alhendawi briefs reporters in New York via satellite from Dakar, Senegal. Martin Nesirky, Spokesperson for the Secretary-General, is at right. UN Photo/JC McIlwaine
Youth Envoy Ahmad Alhendawi briefs reporters in New York via satellite from Dakar, Senegal. Martin Nesirky, Spokesperson for the Secretary-General, is at right. UN Photo/JC McIlwaine

The process of establishing a post-2015 development agenda must include youth input and participation to reflect the issues that concern them, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s Envoy on Youth stressed today in his first press conference since he assumed office.

“We are at a crossroads. With 1,000 days left to meet the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), we are discussing and trying to set the new priorities for the post-2015 development agenda,” said Ahmad Alhendawi, referring to the eight anti-poverty targets with specific objectives on poverty alleviation, education, gender equality, child and maternal health, environmental stability, HIV/AIDS reduction, and a ‘Global Partnership for Development.’

“This is definitely an opportunity where young people can participate in setting the agenda, and then own this agenda by being equal partners in its implementation and evaluation,” he told reporters in New York via satellite from Dakar, Senegal, where he is attending the World Education Forum.

Mr. Alhendawi stressed that with 1.2 billion young people globally – the largest ever population of young people – issues such as education and unemployment need to be addressed by policymakers. Continue reading “Post-2015 development agenda must address youth issues – new UN envoy”

Leadership Council Member Amina Mohammed Interviewed on Post-2015

The Guardian‘s Liz Ford interviewed ASG Amina Mohammed in Monrovia during the most recent meeting of the High Level Panel on the Post-2015 Development Process. Mohammed, who is also a member of the Leadership Council of the SDSN, is Special Adviser to SG Ban Ki-moon on Post-2015 Development Planning and is responsible for coordinating the various work streams on Post-2015, both inside and outside the UN system.

Mohammed said, “I don’t think we ever have enough time, but the time we have got is sufficient to get concrete ideas to shape what we want to do post-2015, drawing on so much that has already been done.” She also spoke about the inclusion of human rights, and the challenge of integrating so many different stakeholders and streams of work.

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